Archive for the ‘Wooly Bugger’ Tag

Pictures from the Weekend   6 comments

Stephen Rose and I got out over the weekend to a creek that has baffled and battered us for some time now. This creek doesn’t give up its fish easily. There may not even be that many fish in this creek, but it is certainly enticing. It is a beautiful place, not far from home, with lots of fishy-looking spots. Others who’ve fished it have reported successes and failures. It is popular with fly fishermen, probably because of the many “improved” areas that allow a person to cast a fly rod.

Stephen got a few strikes but couldn’t connect. I got one fish on a wooly bugger. The fishing that was had would not make a very good extreme fly fishing movie. But, like you’ll hear from many fly fishermen, it was a beautiful experience.

I hope you enjoy the pictures.

Double Surgeon's Knot, by Stephen Rose

Double Surgeon's Knot, by Stephen Rose

Clipping the Tags

Clipping the Tags

Stephen working an Adam's in a very attractive pool

Stephen working an Adam's in a very attractive pool

This flower is every fly fisherman's nightmare (Black-Eyed Susan)

This flower is every fly fisherman's nightmare (Black-Eyed Susan)

Pretty, isn't it?

Pretty, isn't it?

Another failed attempt to lure a fish from a fantastic bend pool

Another failed attempt to lure a fish from a fantastic bend pool

Ha! I fooled a fish!

Ha! I fooled a fish!

Please, God, just let me catch a fish! There have got to be fish in there!

Please, God, just let me catch a fish! There have got to be fish in there!

This farmer mows a path along the stream. Thanks buddy!

This farmer mows a path along the stream. Thanks buddy!

 

 

 

I went trout fishing this morning   Leave a comment

It has seriously been about 2 months since I’ve wetted a line in a trout stream. I hit Elvers Creek this morning and had some success!

Elvers Creek Brown Trout

Elvers Creek Brown Trout

Good to think about fishing for trout again. The conditions are very nice compared to July.

Feeling Good on Elvers Creek

Feeling Good on Elvers Creek

 

 

 

Spin or Fly?!?!   3 comments

Yesterday I hit the world-renowned Gordon Creek. I decided to take both my spinning rod (w/ a Panther Martin lure) and my fly rod along.

The idea was to use the spinning rod sparingly if the fly fishing was slow. So, the first five casts I made into Gordon Creek were with my spinner. I pulled out five trout, from eight to twelve inches long. Nice! “The fish are hungry today!” I thought to myself.

I took a short walk back to my car to put the spinning rod away, figuring the fly rod would land me enough fish to keep things interesting.

Off I went with fly rod and fly box in hand. I tied everything but the kitchen sink to the end of my tippet and in two hours had only one fish bump my fly. There were hoppers in the tall grass, so I tried a hopper. Scuds, Pink Squirrels, Wooley Buggers, Adams. Nuthin.

So, either I stink at presenting flies to fish, or spinners are much more irresistible to trout.

I had a discussion early this year with Nick Volk at On the Creek Fly Shop in Cross Plains, discussing spinning vs fly fishing for trout. I asked him “Nick, am I ever going to catch as many trout on flies as I can on spinners?”. He said, “You’ll catch more on flies.” He was adamant.

 I hope Nick is right. I want Nick to be right. Casting a fly rod is so much fun, and catching fish on a fly rod is so much fun too. Fly fishing has everything going for it. Except I can’t seem to catch many fish on flies.

Perhaps it’s time for a fly-fishing-for-trout hiatus. Spinners seem to be the ticket this time of year. The flies do seem to work well on the Bluegills, however…

Black Earth Creek on this Fine Day   Leave a comment

Over lunch I hit BEC and had an interesting, enjoyable time.

First off, what a beautiful day! 80-degrees and it finally feels like spring has bullied its way onto the scene. Second, I fished today without waders since I was only out for a short time. I found it freeing to not be burdened by the extra luggage and time required to put on waders and boots. But I also found that I needed to be in the water to achieve the presentations I hoped for. So off with the shoes and socks, hike up the pants, and I’m good to go.

Was the water cold? Yes. But after a few minutes my feet numbed to the cold and to the discomfort of walking over small stones, so I guess it worked out for the best.

Now for the fishing. I started off slinging a large streamer to see about getting some large trout action in a large hole. Pretty large idea, eh? I thought so too. But nobody in the water seemed to care for my large streamer (I’m talking a 6″ long yellow pike fly). Oh well. I then tied on an egg sucking leech and got a little action down deep, but lost the fish. It was probably a 12″-er, but it was hard to tell how large because it was deep down in that 7-foot hole.

While tying on that leech pattern a fish rose to hit a blue-winged olive type bug. They, along with midges, were hatching, though sparsely. So after the leech yielded nothing I tied on an elk hair caddis, probably a number 18. First cast and a decent fish, perhaps the one I lost the leech, rose to slam it. But either it spit the fly or I reacted too quickly and I had a line full of nothin’ on the end of my rod.

While fishing this large hole I heard, then saw, fish rising to these Baetis bugs. I  mosey’d downstream to a nice spot to cast and fired the elk hair fly to the exact spot I saw a fish rise. BAM! I pulled the trigger too soon again and missed it. But a few casts later to that same locale and I had my fish. Wonderful! It is such a joy to fish by sight, to set the hook based on seeing a fish strike.

I had a couple more minutes before needing to return to my car and to work, and I cast to a few different places where I’d seen fish rising. I got one more hookup before my time on the creek ran out.

I know it seems silly but I suppose those of you who’ve had the pleasure of carefully casting a dry fly to rising fish can understand my joy in catching silly little Brown Trout on surface patterns. There’s something satisfying about fooling a fish so thoroughly.

Small Brown Trout on Elk Hair Caddis, Black Earth Creek

Small Brown Trout on Elk Hair Caddis, Black Earth Creek

Recent Success   Leave a comment

Here are some photos of locations and fish on a recent outing in Dane County. I’ve been told by Todd Opsal of On The Creek Fly Shop in Cross Plains that the fish are still sluggish and that with warmer weather, we’ll get more active trout. None the less, these outings are good for my soul! 

Gordon Creek Headwaters

Gordon Creek Headwaters

 

 

Brown on a Wooly Bugger

Brown on a Wooly Bugger

 

Sandhill Crane near Gordon Creek, WI

Sandhill Crane near Gordon Creek, WI

 

Brook Trout, Gordon Creek

Brook Trout, Gordon Creek

 

Driftless Area Farmhouse, WI

Driftless Area Farmhouse, WI

 

Tree Roots sipping from Gordon Creek

Tree Roots sipping from Gordon Creek