Archive for the ‘Iowa County’ Category

Fishing!   Leave a comment

Stephen got out today, lucky dog!

 

Stephen Rose at Trout Creek, Iowa County

Stephen Rose at Trout Creek, Iowa County

 

Here’s what I did today…

 

I could really use some time on a river.

I could really use some time on a river.

 

 

 

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Beastly Brown   2 comments

Stephen Rose, Gregg Kissel and I found ourselves in the Wisconsin Driftless late last week pursuing fall trout in a beautiful spring-fed creek. This particular creek, a trib of the Blue River, was littered with Chubs, which is usually cause for an obstreperous outing. Indeed, many of the fish brought to hand were Chubs, but the upside, at least in theory, was that any trout lurking in the big pools of this little creek were likely to have dined on Chubs, giving the trout license to grow big and beastly.

Stephen was dredging a pool with a white woolly bugger downstream from me. I heard a holler from him and turned around to see his rod arched into a crescent, his line piercing the water and vibrating like a banjo string. I ran toward him to lend a hand. I waded into the pool and scooped the fish at the exact moment the knot on his hook eye failed. In four years of fly fishing for Driftless spring creek trout, this is the largest Stephen has caught. We didn’t get a measurement but by any appraisal it’s a nice fish for a stream that probably has a flow rate of 10 cubic feet per second.

After some photos Stephen put him back and he darted for the depths to regain his strength for the upcoming spawn, and to grow even larger for another encounter in the future.

 

Stephen Rose with a nice Wisconsin Driftless Brown

Stephen Rose with a nice Wisconsin Driftless Brown

 

Wisconsin's Driftless Region in late September

Wisconsin’s Driftless Region in late September

 

 

Memorable Monday   6 comments

On Memorial Day I was supposed to go fishing with my buddy Stephen Rose. But when I woke up at 5:30 and checked my phone, he had left a few text messages which said, in a somber tone, that he was feeling terrible and wouldn’t be making it out to fish. He must have felt very badly because this man has been on me about getting out to a trout stream. So, I was a little bummed to think I’d be going fishing alone, but I muddled through, got my coffee into the thermos, and hit the road.

Having new parameters from which to work (no fishing partner) I decided to try some new water out. I headed toward Dodgeville and didn’t know where I’d stop. I had forgotten my Gazetteer and trout maps, so I had to rely on my phone for help finding blue lines. Using your phone for this purpose doesn’t hold a candle next to a good Gazetteer and hard copies of county trout maps. I located a creek along Hwy Y in Iowa County. It turned out to be Mill Creek, but not the wonderful Mill Creek of Richland County. No, this was the Mill Creek of Iowa County.

 

Mill Creek, Iowa County, Wisconsin

Mill Creek, Iowa County, Wisconsin

 

I dropped in to the creek where it kisses the road on the southeast side and fished upstream for a couple of hours. The water looked trouty, and fish were nipping at my fly, but the fish weren’t trout, they were chubs. When you’re fishing for trout, especially in the “overly-affected” (read: “fancy”) fly fishing method of fishing for trout, a chub is like finding a long (or short, curly) hair in your hash browns. You kind of wrinkle your nose and curse under your breath and think to yourself, “where in hell are the trout?”

This went on for a good long while. I even caught a six-inch shiner. I don’t know what’s wrong with Mill Creek. It looks lovely in the picture, doesn’t it?

So, with two hours of fishing behind me and two hours left, I decided to travel east and a little north to Trout Creek, thinking to myself “at least it isn’t named Chub Creek”.

I didn’t have real high hopes, though the stream looked very nice. But listen, this is Iowa County we’re talking about. How good could it be?

I walked downstream from the bridge past about thirty tight meanders. I got after it and started fishing with a woolly bugger (is it true they call them “boogers” out West?). I tried not to be noisy, but I feel like I was, on account of the sedimentary nature of the stream bank.

Anyway, I drifted the bugger a few times upstream, finishing the drift about even with where I was standing, but along the opposite bank. I began lifting my rod tip and felt a tug, then a whole lot of tug, followed by some really pissed off tugging. The water was a bit cloudy due to the wet weather, so I didn’t get a look right away, and after a minute I thought I might have foul-hooked an average trout, but then I tired it enough to get it to the surface and saw that it was a good size. Sweet! A trout, and a nice one too!

 

a Sixteen Inch Brown from Trout Creek

a Sixteen Inch Brown from Trout Creek

 

I smiled happily, thinking my trout-fishing outing has been a success, and moved up to the next likely bit of tailwater. A few nicely-placed casts later, Bam! Another good fish. How about that?!

 

Another sixteen inch Brown Trout from Trout Creek

Another sixteen inch Brown Trout from Trout Creek

 

I moved upstream again. I think I had to fish two or three bends and had to endure catching a ten-inch trout before my third dance with another sizeable fish. But low-and-behold, there was my third sixteen-inch Brown Trout in thirty minutes.

 

Big Trout number three, Trout Creek, Iowa County, WI

Big Trout number three, Trout Creek, Iowa County, WI

 

I’ve never had this kind of experience, catching three big trout in a little stream in such a short time. I’ve caught lots of “regular sized” trout in one outing, and I’ve had outings where I’ve had one bigger fish to hand, but never before have I zeroed in on what were likely the biggest trout in their holes on one stretch of stream over a narrow window of time.

Was it the weather? The water conditions? The big, juicy fly? I don’t know. I likely won’t repeat it for a long time. But I’ll certainly not forget this thirty minute window of time on Trout Creek that made for a very memorable Memorial Day.