Archive for November 2012

An update from the deer hunter   Leave a comment

Stephen Rose and John Jackels went up to Cumberland, Wisconsin this weekend to get after some whitetail deer. I sent Stephen a text last night asking, “Did you get one?”  Here’s the update from Stephen as of 5:30 this morning…

Nothing yet. John got a nubbin buck on the first day but I failed to shoot when I had an opportunity. I sighted a doe in a small group but saw a buck following them out of the corner of my eye. I swung my gun to the buck, he saw, and immediately turned away from me and down a hill. He managed to alert all fived does in front of him at the same time.

Suddenly I had no shot and haven’t had an opportunity since.

The woods are really beautiful but the nice weather is keeping the deer on their beds. We haven’t seen many on our piece of land.

Guns went off everywhere the first day. I heard hundreds. But yesterday was pretty quiet.

Still got this morning…

 

 

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Posted November 19, 2012 by troutseeker in Deer Hunt, Friends, Wisconsin

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Bupkis on the Brule   5 comments

bup·kis (bêp-kês) – noun: absolutely nothing; nothing of value, significance, or substance.

Small, round fecal pellets, referring to the shape of goat droppings.

A colorful Yiddish phrase: “Bupkis mit Kudachas”, translating roughly to “shivering shit balls”.

 

8-wt rods stand at the ready

8-wt rods stand at the ready

 

Stephen Rose, John Jackels and I went up to the Brule River in Douglas County, Wisconsin last Thursday night to take part in the annual fall pursuit of Brule River Steelhead. We went with a cocky sureness that we’d be heros, and we left cold and damp, shivering and sunken.

 

Heading North alongside the Brule Valley

Heading North alongside the Brule Valley

 

The rains in October were said to have made for a nice fall run, not at all like the anemic fall run of 2011. Hopes were high for perhaps a dozen fish during our three day outing. But instead, our lines laid limp in the water while we endured soggy-cold skies and frigid water. We saw a few fish roll and jump but none wanted to play.

Midway through the trip we were so unsure of ourselves that Stephen gave our guide friend Tim Pearson a call to confirm that there were, in fact, still steelhead swimming up the Brule River. He assured Stephen that there were, and encouraged us to keep trying, saying that the most important part of Steelheading is having that fly in the water, working hard to present it with a dead drift.

So after a lunch at the Kro Bar we were back on the water doing our thing.

 

This is Steelheading on the Brule River

This is Steelheading on the Brule River

 

After more of the same we retreated to camp, dry gas station firewood in hand, and Stephen cooked up some venison steaks and tomato soup. Staring into a campfire on a cold fall evening can lift even the most weary angler’s soul. And a superlative sleep in a Hennessy Hammock is a thing that by all rights should be reserved for the gods on Olympus. Don’t be a dink. Get a hammock to camp in.

 

Sleep on a cloud

Sleep on a cloud

 

In the end, the trip was a beautiful thing. The Brule River and the forested valley that it runs through are soul-cleansing, and I’ll plan to go back year after year. And when I hold another chrome trout in my hands it will be all that much sweeter.

 

John and Stephen absorbing heat

John and Stephen absorbing heat